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Nearly a Quarter of UK Flights see Delays

Flight delays

A UK publication, recently reported that almost a quarter of flights to and from the UK totaling to close to 2 million in number experienced at least 15-minute delays. These reports were from the year ending March 2016.

Statistics

Between April 2015 and March 2016, more than 10,000 flights of the 449,000 were found to be at least three hours behind schedule. These delays affected around 43 million passenger journeys. Calculations were made by the Civil Aviation Authority which collated data based on the total amount of flights that were delayed by three hours or longer.

Southend Airport was identified as the number one location where passengers seemed to face the most delays on short-haul flights. Manchester and Gatwick airports also reported a similar story, but their faults involved long-haul flights. They reported that 1.3 percent of their flights were delayed by over three hours.

Aurigny, Loganair, and Vueling were identified as the airline carriers with the most number of delays of three hours or longer. Their short-haul flights reported delays of 1.3 percent, 1.6 percent, and 1.9 percent respectively.

Regarding long-haul flights, the research showed that passengers flying with US Airways, Air India, and Pakistan International Airlines were most prone to three-hour delays. Reports stated that these carriers showed 2.1 percent, 3.7 percent, and 4.2 percent respectively in total delays, with a Pakistan International Airlines flight showing an average delay of at least 45 minutes.

Compensation claims

After releasing the research, Which? has been encouraging passengers to claim appropriate flight delay compensation for the inconvenience caused by these flight delays. The publication has also warned passengers that in some cases payouts may not be made, especially when it involved factors such as airport strikes or extreme weather conditions.

They also stated that if a passenger were to claim the compensation, it would depend on how long the flight was delayed for and the distance of their flight. Passengers, who were scheduled for long-haul flights, could be awarded about £250 (€300) if their flight was delayed by three or four hours. If their flights were delayed by at least four hours, they are entitled to about £510 (€600). On the other hand, passengers who were flying on short-haul flights were entitled to claim up to £210 (€250) if their flights were behind schedule by over three hours.

Alex Neill, the director of policy and campaigns at Which?, mentioned how frustrating it is for passengers to arrive at the airport and discover that their flights have been delayed. He said that it is even more distressing for holidaymakers in the summer to learn of their flight delays.

Neill also stated that despite flight delays, tens of thousands of people were not claiming compensation they are entitled to. This is why Which? has been encouraging passengers to claim for what they are rightfully entitled to.

Flight delays can cause serious distress and issues for passengers who are on tight schedules such as business trips or vacations. This research is evidence that airline carriers must pull up their socks and reduce inconvenience for their passengers.

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